Regular vaccination is critical to the health of your pet. Many diseases are prevented through vaccines, and although there is a slight chance a pet can have a reaction to a vaccine, it is uncommon.

Dogs:

We recommend starting vaccines for DHPP (Distemper, Hepatitis, Parinfluenza and Parvo) at 6 weeks of age. In order to keep the immunity where it needs to be, we recommend boostering that vaccine every 3-4 weeks until the puppy is at least 12 weeks of age. If the first vaccine is given 12 weeks or later, then one booster needs to be given after the original vaccine.

Rabies is given at 12 weeks of age.

Rabies and DHPP are boostered the first year; it is then recommended to booster DHPP every 3 years.

Rabies is required by law to vaccinate every 3 years. This is due to recent studies indicating that we may be over vaccinating our pets. Some studies indicate that titers from vaccines last longer than originally thought.

We do not routinely vaccinate for Leptospirosis or Corona Virus. Neither of these virus’s are commonly seen in our area. Lepto is the most reactive component in vaccines, increasing the chance of an anaphylactic reaction; therefore we have chosen not to vaccinate for this virus unless your pet is at a higher exposure risk.

Cats:

We recommend starting vaccines for FVRCP (Feline Rhinotracheitis, Calici Virus and Panleukopenia) at 6 weeks of age. In order to keep the immunity where it needs to be, we advise a booster every 3-4 weeks until the kitten is 12 weeks of age.

Leukemia (FeLV) can be given after 10 weeks of age, and must be boostered 3-4 weeks later. If the first vaccine is given 12 weeks or later, then one booster needs to be given after the original vaccine.

Rabies is given at 12 weeks of age. Rabies and FVRCP are boostered the first year. It is then recommended to vaccinate every 3 years (for indoor cats) for FVRCP. Rabies is given yearly, as recommended by the manufacture.

Horses:

 

Cattle: 

 

Vaccine Reactions

Anytime a pet receives vaccinations, there is a potential for side effects. Even if a pet has received a vaccination in the past, a reaction can still occur. Vaccine reactions are a rare occurrence, but every pet parent needs to watch for signs associated with a potential vaccine reaction.

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Lethargy
  • Pet has a hard time breathing
  • Swelling of the face
  • Hives on the body
  • Seizures

If you see any of these symptoms, please call our practice immediately. This is an emergency!

You may also see some localized swelling at the site of the vaccine, and although this is also considered a reaction, it is normal, and is not an emergency. The lump will slowly disappear over a period of about 3 weeks, after the vaccine was administered.